The Curling Manual

Table of Contents

Appendix C Measuring Rocks

Occasionally, two or more rocks are too close to measure by eye. Measuring the rocks by device will help. There are three types of measuring devices available at most clubs. The first and most often used device is simply called the "measure". It is used to determine the counting rock or rocks in the house. The second device is called the "six foot" measure. It is used to determine whether or not a rock is in the house. It is also used to determine if a rock is in play at the back of the house. Unlike the above device, it may be used during the end. There are only two reasons to use the six-foot measure during an end:

1. To determine if a rock, at the intersection of the back line and centerline, is in play. The back line overlaps the back of the house and if the lines were installed properly, a rock that is not within six feet of the center, it is not only out of the house, it's out of play.

Free Guard Zone Measure

2. To determine if a rock is in the house. If the free guard zone rule is being played, it can be used during the first four rocks.

The third measuring device is called the "90 degree" measure". It is an "L" shaped piece of metal use to determine if a rock is in play around the perimeter of the playing area.

Measuring Procedures

Vice skips are responsible for measuring rocks if necessary. The following is the correct procedure for measuring. Rocks are measured clockwise from the back of the house. This is the standard.

Measuring Two Rocks

  • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point (the part that goes in the center hole) in your right hand.
  • You will measure rocks in a forward, clockwise direction to avoid "backing" into a rock and displacing it. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device on the ice 90 - 180 degrees from the first rock to be measured. This allows you to place the device on the ice away from the rocks to be measured.
  • As you approach the first rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them.
  • Measure the front of the first rock (never measure the back of the rock as rocks have different diameters), leave it in place and remember the reading on the device.
  • Slowly move the device clockwise to the next rock, putting no downward pressure on the device.
  • Measure the second rock and make a decision as to which one is closer. Move the second rock either in or out depending on the result and point to the closer rock for spectators.

Measuring Three Rocks

  • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point in your right hand.
  • You will measure rocks in a clockwise direction. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device to the left of the odd-colored rock.
  • As you approach the odd-colored rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them.
  • Measure the odd colored rock first and leave it in place.
  • Swing the device clockwise to the next rock and measure it.
  • After making the decision on the second rock, move it either in or out depending on the decision. Indicate with your hand the closer rock.
  • Move to the third rock and measure it. Again, move it in or out based on your decision. The first rock (odd-colored) will be your reference rock and should not be moved.
  • In both situations it is acceptable to swing the device back to the first rock for a closer look. If rocks cannot be determined by device, a blank end will result. This is very rare.
  • If two or more rocks are so close to the button that the device cannot be used, a decision must be made visually. Find an impartial person to do this for you.

Using the Six-Foot Measure

  • Enter the house from the rear with the pointer in your right hand.
  • Place the six-foot pointer in the center hole and rest the device on the ice at 90-180 degrees from the first rock.
  • Slowly swing the device clockwise until it either contacts the rock or swings past it. Never throw the device at the rock as it may come out of the hole and displace the rock.
  • If, during a free guard zone measure, another rock is in the six-foot path, a decision must be made visually.